The Violin in the Subway: Framing Your Hospital Through Social Media

I love reading about the human brain and how it influences our behavior. Some of my favorite books this year were Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain, by John J. Ratey; Oliver Sack’s Musicophilia; and My Stroke of Insight, by Jill Bolte Taylor. So, it probably comes as no surprise that one of my favorite people to follow on Twitter is @TheSocialBrain (Dr. SunWolf).

Dr. SunWolf tweeted an article yesterday that I read three times and couldn’t stop thinking about. An April 2007 story from The Washington Post titled, “Pearls Before Breakfast,” it chronicles an experiment in perception undertaken by The Post and world-famous violinist Joshua Bell. Read more

The Power of Video as Part of Your Social Media Campaign

The power of video in healthcare is undeniable. We’ve seen many examples of this, one of the most notable being the Pink

Glove Dance of Providence St. Vincent Medical Center in Portland, Oregon, created by hospital staff to raise awareness of breast cancer. Since it debuted last year, it has garnered more than 12 million views on YouTube.

The number of online videos viewed in November of this year demonstrates just how important video is. According to Comscore, 172 million U.S. Internet users watched online video content in November alone, totaling about 5.2 billion viewing sessions. Read more

Pancakes for Dinner, Forever! Using Social Media as a Women’s Health Tool

I am a young mother with two children. I have lots of friends who are mothers. Some of them work outside the home, but many of them stay at home with their kids. The other day, one of my friends, who is a fantastic stay-at-home mom, posted on Facebook that she loathes everything about dinnertime—from figuring out what to eat, to cooking it, to making sure her kids eat it, to cleaning up afterward. She said, “I just want to cook pancakes for dinner for the rest of our lives.”

The comments piled up quickly, with almost everyone in vehement agreement. The only two people out, of about twenty, who didn’t feel exactly the same way, were a friend’s husband and myself. Read more